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    Dr. Dia Vickery

    Woodland Hills, CA, US.

    • Acupuncture

    About

    Dr Dia Vickery came to acupuncture after her career in computer science.
    Her formal training in acupuncture began in 1992 when she enrolled in the Masters program at SAMRA University. She completed her coursework in under two years, finishing just as the Northridge earthquake shook everyone up. Deciding that she wasn’t ready to continue on into the Clinic, she left SAMRA and turned to Theology. Finishing her PhD in 1996, she went on to work as Clergy-at-Large until late 2000 when she decided to complete her Oriental Medicine studies.
    After much research, Dr Vickery decided to finish at Emperor’s College of Traditional Oriental Medicine and was licensed in 2004. After licensing, Dr Vickery served as Dean of Students, instructor and assistant clinic supervisor at Emperor’s College until August 2007 when she left academia to focus full-time on treating patients. In 2018 Dr Vickery received her Doctor of Acupuncture and Chinese Medicine from PCOM.
    In addition to acupuncture, Dr Vickery studied Aroma Acupoint Therapy with Peter Holmes and Tiffany Carole, aromatherapy safety and skin care with Robert Tisserand and Face Yoga with Fumiko Takatsu, becoming a certified Face Yoga instructor.

    Philosophy

    My Philosophy:
    I believe in good health.
    I don’t believe this should be something that is difficult or esoteric, but I do believe it takes attending to. In the same way one attends to one’s general hygiene, I believe we must caretake our health.
    I believe we should attend to our health BEFORE we need drastic interventions. And I know that’s something acupuncture & oriental medicine is very good at. In fact, this idea underlies Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM). In one of our foundation texts, the Ling Shu, it is stated “The superior physician treats that which is not yet ill. The inferior physician treats that which is already ill.”.
    But how do we, as healthcare practitioners in the 21st century, balance the requirements of “medical necessity”, “evidence-based medicine”, “outcome assessments” and “reasonable and necessary” (as applied by insurance providers, Medicare and the Government) with this millennia-old idea of nurturing health?
    It’s a tough question. My answer is to give my patients the best care I can and follow the guidelines of professionalism, beginning with “first, do no harm”. I give my patients the tools they need to maintain their good health, I speak with them about visits to their general practitioners or specialists, I encourage them to engage with their other practitioners and I refer them to other practitioners when it is appropriate.But how do we, as healthcare practitioners in the 21st century, balance the requirements of “medical necessity”, “evidence-based medicine”, “outcome assessments” and “reasonable and necessary” (as applied by insurance providers, Medicare and the Government) with this millennia-old idea of nurturing health?
    I believe in the power, subtlety and majesty of the medicine I am trained to practice, in the transformative properties bound within this medicine and the boundless ability of the human body/mind/spirit to encompass that transformation.But how do we, as healthcare practitioners in the 21st century, balance the requirements of “medical necessity”, “evidence-based medicine”, “outcome assessments” and “reasonable and necessary” (as applied by insurance providers, Medicare and the Government) with this millennia-old idea of nurturing health?
    I believe in good health.

    Associations

    • CSOMA
    • AAAOM
    • AIHM

    Qualifications

    2003 - MTOM, Emperor's College of Traditional Orienal Medicine, 2014 - Certified AAT practitioner, 2017 - Certified Face Yoga instructor, 2018 - DACM, Pacific College of Oriental Medicine

    Years In Practice

    15 Years

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